Chickasaw Land Map + Treaties


Chickasaw Location

At some time around 1300, the Chickasaw crossed the Mississippi River from an earlier location to the west (in the Red River Valley). According to tradition, their first permanent settlement east of the river was Chickasaw Old Fields on the Tennessee River, just west of Huntsville, Alabama. Although they maintained a presence in northwest Alabama in later years, by 1700 Chickasaw Old Fields had moved southwest to the headwaters of the Tombigbee River in northeast Mississippi... Lee Sultzman, Historian of Native America

Chickasaw Land Cession Map

Tract 55:

Treaty with the Chickasaw, 1805
July 23, 1805. | 7 Stat., 89. | Ratified May 22, 1807. | Proclaimed May 23, 1807

Indian Affairs: Laws and Treaties. Vol. II (Treaties)
Compiled and edited by Charles J. Kappler
Washington : Government Printing Office, 1904

Articles of arrangement made and concluded in the Chickasaw country, between James Robertson and Silas Dinsmoor, commissioners of the United States of the one part, and the Mingo chiefs and warriors of the Chickasaw nation of Indians on the other part.

ART. I. WHEREAS the Chickasaw nation of Indians have been for some time embarrassed by heavy debts due to their merchants and traders, and being destitute-of funds to effect important improvements in their country, they have agreed and do hereby agree to cede to the United States, and forever quit claim to the tract of country included within the following bounds, to wit: beginning on the left bank of Ohio, at the point where the present Indian boundary adjoins the same, thence down the left bank of Ohio to the Tennessee river, thence up the main channel of the Tennessee river to the mouth of Duck river; thence up the left bank of Duck river to the Columbian highway or road leading from Nashville to Natchez, thence along the said road to the ridge dividing the waters running into Duck river from those running into Buffaloe river, thence easterly along the said ridge to the great ridge dividing the waters running into the main Tennessee river from those running into Buffaloe river near the main source of Buffaloe river, thence in a direct line to the Great Tennessee river near the Chickasaw old fields or eastern point of the Chickasaw claim on that river; thence northwardly to the great ridge dividing the waters running into the Tennessee from those running into Cumberland river, so as to include all the waters running into Elk river, thence along the top of the said great ridge to the place of beginning: reserving a tract of one mile square adjoining to, and below the mouth of Duck river on the Tennessee, for the use of the chief O’Koy or Tishumastubbee.

ART. II. The United States on their part, and in consideration of the above cession, agree to make the following payments, to wit: Twenty thousand dollars for the use of the nation at large, and for the payment of the debts due to their merchants and traders; and to George Colbert and O’Koy two thousand dollars, that is, to each one thousand dollars. This sum is granted to them at the request of the national council for services rendered their nation, and is to be subject to their individual order, witnessed by the resident agent; also to Chinubbee Mingo, the king of the nation, an annuity of one hundred dollars, during his natural life, granted as a testimony of his personal worth and friendly disposition. All the above payments are to be made in specie.

ART. III. In order to preclude for ever all disputes relative to the boundary mentioned in the first section, it is hereby stipulated, that the same shall be ascertained and marked by a commissioner or commissioners on the part of the United States, accompanied by such person as the Chickasaws may choose, so soon as the Chickasaws shall have thirty days’ notice of the time and place, at which the operation is to commence: and the United States will pay the person appointed on the part of the Chickasaws two dollars per day during his actual attendance on that service.

ART. IV. It is hereby agreed on the part of the United States, that from and after the ratification of these articles, no settlement shall be made by any citizen, or permitted by the government of the United States, on that part of the present cession included between the present Indian boundary and the Tennessee, and between the Ohio and a line drawn due north from the mouth of Buffaloe to the ridge dividing the waters of Cumberland from those of the Tennessee river, to the term of three years.

ART. V. The articles now stipulated will be considered as permanent additions to the treaties now in force between the contracting parties, as soon as they shall have been ratified by the President of the United States of America, by and with the advice and consent of the Senate of the said United States.
In witness of all and every thing herein determined, the parties have hereunto interchangeably set their hands and seals, in the Chickasaw country, this twenty-third day of July, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and five, and of the independence of the United States of America the thirtieth...


Tract 80:

Treaty with the Chickasaw, 1816
Sept. 20, 1816. | 7 Stat., 150. | Proclamation, Dec. 30. 1816

Indian Affairs: Laws and Treaties. Vol. II (Treaties)
Compiled and edited by Charles J. Kappler
Washington : Government Printing Office, 1904

To settle all territorial controversies, and to perpetuate that peace and harmony which has long happily subsisted between the United States and Chickasaw nation, the president of the United States of America, by major general Andrew Jackson, general David Meriwether, and Jesse Franklin, esq. on the one part, and the whole Chickasaw nation, in council assembled, on the other, have agreed on the following articles, which when ratified by the president, with the advice and consent of the senate of the United States, shall be binding on all parties:

ART. 1. Peace and friendship are hereby firmly established, and perpetuated, between the United States of America and Chickasaw nation.

ART. 2. The Chickasaw nation cede to the United States (with the exception of such reservations as shall hereafter be specified) all right or title to lands on the north side of the Tennessee river, and relinquish all claim to territory on the south side of said river, and east of a line commencing at the mouth of Caney creek running up said creek to its source, thence a due south course to the ridge path, or commonly called Gaines’s road, along said road south westwardly to a point on the Tombigby river, well known by the name of the Cotton Gin port, and down the west bank of the Tombigby to the Chocktaw boundary.

ART. 3. In consideration of the relinquishment of claim, and cession of lands, made in the preceding article, the commissioners agree to allow the Chickasaw nation twelve thousand dollars per annum for ten successive years, and four thousand five hundred dollars to be paid in sixty days after the ratification of this treaty into the hands of Levi Colbert, as a compensation for any improvements which individuals of the Chickasaw nation may have had on the lands surrendered; that is to say, two thousand dollars for improvements on the east side of the Tombigby, and two thousand five hundred dollars for improvements on the north side of the Tennessee river.

ART. 4. The commissioners agree that the following tracts of land shall be reserved to the Chickasaw nation:

1. One tract of land for the use of Col. George Colbert and heirs, and which is thus described by said Colbert: “Beginning on the north bank of the Tennessee river, at a point that, running north four miles, will include a big spring, about half way between his ferry and the mouth of Cypress, it being a spring that a large cow-path crosses its branch near where a cypress tree is cut down; thence westwardly to a point, four miles from the Tennessee river, and standing due north of a point on the north bank of the river, three [four] miles below his ferry on the Tennessee river, and up the meanders of said river to the beginning point.

2. A tract of land two miles square on the north bank of ’the Tennessee river, and at its junction with Beach creek, for the use of Appassan Tubby and heirs.

3. A tract of land one mile square, on the north side of the Tennessee river, for the use of John M’Cleish and heirs, the said tract to be so run as to include the said M’Cleish’s settlement and improvements on the north side of Buffalo creek.

4. Two tracts of land, containing forty acres each, on the south side of the Tennessee river, and about two and a half miles below the Cotton Gin port, on the Tombigby river, which tracts of land will be pointed out by Major Levi Colbert, and for the use of said Colbert and heirs.
It is stipulated that the above reservations shall appertain to the Chickasaw nation only so long as they shall be occupied, cultivated, or used, by the present proprietors or heirs and in the event of all or either of said tracts of land, so reserved, being abandoned by the present proprietors or heirs, each tract or tracts of land, so abandoned, shall revert to the United States as a portion of that territory ceded by the second article of this treaty.

ART. 5. The two contracting parties covenant and agree that the line on the south side of the Tennessee river, as described in the second article of this treaty, shall be ascertained and marked by commissioners to be appointed by the president of the United States; that the marks shall be bold; trees to be blazed on both sides of the line, and the fore and aft trees to be marked with the letters U. S. That the commissioners shall be attended by two persons to be designated by the Chickasaw nation, and that the said nation shall have due and seasonable notice when said operation is to be commenced.

ART. 6. In consideration of the conciliatory disposition evinced, during the negotiation of this treaty, by the Chickasaw chiefs and warriors, but more particularly as a manifestation of the friendship and liberality of the president of the United States, the commissioners agree to give, on the ratification of this treaty, to Chinnubby, king of the Chickasaws, to Tishshominco, William McGilvery, Arpasarshtubby, Samuel Scely, James Brown, Levi Colbert, Ickaryoucullaha, George Pettygrove, Immartarharmicko, Chickasaw chiefs, and to Malcolm M’Gee, interpreter, one hundred and fifty dollars each, in goods or cash, as may be preferred and to major William Glover, colonel George Colbert, capt. Rabbitt, Hoparyeahoummar, Immoukeloursharhoparyea, Hoparyea, Houllartir, Tushkerhopoyyea, Hoparyreahoummar, jun. Immoukelusharhopoyyea, James Colbert, Coweamarthlar, and Iilnachouwarhopoyyea, military leaders, one hundred dollars each; and, as a particular mark of distinction and favor for his long services and faithful adherence to the United States government, the commissioners agree to allow to general William Colbert an annuity of one hundred dollars for and during his life.

ART. 7. “Whereas the chiefs and warriors of the Chickasaw nation have found, from experience, that the crowd of pedlars, who are constantly traversing their nation from one end to the other, is of a serious disadvantage to the nation; that serious misunderstandings and disputes frequently take place, as well as frauds, which are often practiced on the ignorant and uninformed of the nation, therefore it is agreed by the commissioners on the part of the government, and the chiefs of the nation, that no more licenses shall be granted by the agent of the Chickasaws to entitle any person or traffic merchandise in said nation; and that any person or persons, whomsoever, of the white people, who shall bring goods and sell them in the nation, contrary to this article, shall forfeit the whole of his or their goods, one half to the nation and the other half to the government of the United States; in all cases where this article is violated, and the goods are taken or seized, they shall be delivered up to the agent, who shall hear the testimony and judge accordingly.”
This article was presented to the commissioners by the chiefs and warriors of the Chickasaw nation, and by their particular solicitation embraced in this treaty.
Done at the Chickasaw council house, this twentieth day of September, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixteen.

Andrew Jackson, [L. S.]


Tract 100:

Treaty with the Chickasaw, 1818
The Great Chickasaw Cession
Oct. 19, 1818. | 7 Stat., 192. | Proclamation, Jan. 7, 1819

Indian Affairs: Laws and Treaties. Vol. II (Treaties)
Compiled and edited by Charles J. Kappler
Washington : Government Printing Office, 1904

Treaty with the Chickasaws, to settle all territorial controversies, and to remove all ground of complaint or dissatisfaction, that might arise to interrupt the peace and harmony which have so long and so happily existed between the United States of America and the Chickesaw nation of Indians, James Monroe, President of the said United States, by Isaac Shelby and Andrew Jackson, of the one part, and the whole Chickesaw nation, by their chiefs, head men, and warriors, in full council assembled, of the other part, have agreed on the following articles; which, when ratified by the President and Senate of the United States of America, shall form a treaty binding on all parties.

ART. 1. Peace and friendship are hereby firmly established and made perpetual, between the United States of America and the Chickesaw nation of Indians.

ART. 2. To obtain the object of the foregoing article, the Chickesaw nation of Indians cede to the United States of America, (with the exception of such reservation as shall be hereafter mentioned,) all claim or title which the said nation has to the land lying north of the south boundary of the state of Tennessee, which is bounded south by the thirty-fifth degree of north latitude, and which lands, hereby ceded, lies within the following boundary, viz: Beginning on the Tennessee river, about thirty-five miles, by water, below colonel George Colbert’s ferry, where the thirty-fifth degree of north latitude strikes the same;thence, due west, with said degree of north latitude, to where it cuts the Mississippi river at or near the Chickasaw Bluffs; thence, up the said Mississippi river, to the mouth of the Ohio; thence, up the Ohio river, to the mouth of Tennessee river; thence, up the Tennessee river, to the place of beginning.

ART. 3. In consideration of the relinquishment of claim and cession of lands in the preceding article, and to perpetuate the happiness of the Chickesaw nation of Indians, the commissioners of the United States, before named, agree to allow the said nation the sum of twenty thousand dollars per annum, for fifteen successive years, to be paid annually; and, as a farther consideration for the objects aforesaid, and at the request of the chiefs of the said nation, the commissioners agree to pay captain John Gordon, of Tennessee, the sum of one thousand one hundred and fifteen dollars, it being a debt due by general William Colbert, of said nation, to the aforesaid Gordon; and the further sum of two thousand dollars, due by said nation of Indians, to captain David Smith, now of Kentucky, for that sum by him expended, in supplying himself and forty-five soldiers from Tennessee, in the year one thousand seven hundred and ninety-five, when assisting them (at their request and invitation,) in defending their towns against the invasion of the Creek Indians; both which sums, (on the application of the said nation,) is to be paid, within sixty days after the ratification of this treaty, to the aforesaid Gordon and Smith.

ART. 4. The commissioners agree, on the further and particular application of the chiefs, and for the benefit of the poor and warriors of the said nation, that a tract of land, containing four miles square, to include a salt lick or springs, on or near the river Sandy, a branch of the Tennessee river, and within the land hereby ceded, be reserved, and to be laid off in a square or oblong, so as to include the best timber, at the option of their beloved chief Levi Colbert, and major James Brown, or either of them; who are hereby made agents and trustees for the nation, to lease the said salt lick or springs, on the following express conditions, viz: For the benefit of this reservation, as before recited, the trustees or agents are bound to lease the said reservation to some citizen or citizens of the United States, for a reasonable quantity salt, to be paid annually to the said nation, for the use thereof; and that, from and after two years after the ratification of this treaty, no salt, made at the works to be erected on this reservation, shall be sold within the limits of the same for a higher price than one dollar per bushel of fifty pounds weight; on failure of which the lease shall be forfeited, and the reservation revert to the United States.

ART. 5. The commissioners agree, that there shall be paid to Oppassantubby, a principal chief of the Chickesaw nation, within sixty days after the ratification of this treaty, the sum of five hundred dollars, as a full compensation for the reservation of two miles square, on the north side of Tennessee river, secured to him and his heirs by the treaty held, with the said Chickesaw nation, on the twentyeth day of September, 1816; and the further sum of twenty-five dollars to John Lewis, a half breed, for a saddle he lost while in the service of the United States; and, to shew the regard the President of the United States has for the said Chickesaw nation, at the request of the chiefs of the said nation, the commissioners agree that the sum of one thousand and eighty-nine dollars shall be paid to Maj. James Colbert, interpreter, within the period stated in the first part of this article, it being the amount of a sum of money taken from his pocket, in the month of June, 1816, at the theatre in Baltimore: And the said commissioners, as a further regard for said nation, do agree that the reservations made to George Colbert and Levi Colbert, in the treaty; held at the council house of said nation, on the twenty-sixth [twentieth] day of September, 1816, the first to Col. George Colbert, on the northside of Tennessee river, and those to Maj. Levi Colbert, on the east side of the Tombigby river, shall enure to the sole use of the said Col. George Colbert, and Maj. Levi Colbert, their heirs and assigns, forever, with their butts and bounds, as defined by said treaty, and agreeable to the marks and boundaries as laid off and marked by the surveyor of the United States, where that is the case, and where the reservations has not been laid off and marked by a surveyor of the United States, the same shall be so done as soon after the ratification of this treaty as practicable, on the application of the reservees, or their legally appointed agent under them, and agreeably to the definition in the before recited treaty. This agreement is made on the following express conditions: that the said land, and those living on it, shall be subject to the laws of the United States, and all legal taxation that may be imposed on the land or citizens of the United States inhabiting the territory where said land is situate. The commissioners further agree, that the reservation secured to John McCleish, on the north side of Tennessee river, by the before recited treaty, in consequence of his having been raised in the state of Tennessee, and marrying a white woman, shall enure to the sole use of the said John McCleish, his heirs and assigns, forever, on the same conditions attached to the lands of Col. George Colbert and Maj. Levi Colbert, in this article.

ART. 6. The two contracting parties covenant and agree, that the line of the south boundary of the state of Tennessee, as described in the second article of this treaty, shall be ascertained and marked by commissioners appointed by the President of the United States; that the marks shall be bold; the trees to be blazed on both sides of the line, and the fore and aft trees marked U. S.; and that the commissioners shall be attended by two persons, to be designated by the Chickasaw nation; and the said nation shall have due and seasonable notice when said operation is to be commenced. It is further agreed by the commissioners, that all improvements actually made by individuals of the Chickesaw nation, which shall be found within the lands ceded by this treaty, that a fair and reasonable compensation shall be paid therefor, to the respective individuals having made or owned the same.

ART. 7. In consideration of the friendly and conciliatory disposition evinced during the negociation of this treaty, by the Chickesaw chiefs and warriors, but more particularly, as a manifestation of the friendship and liberality of the President of the United States, the commissioners agree to give, on the ratification of this treaty, to Chinnubby, King of the Chickesaws nation, to Teshuamingo, William M’Gilvery, Anpassantubby, Samuel Seely, James Brown, Levi Colbert, Ickaryoucuttaha, George Pettygrove, Immartarharmicco, Chickesaw chiefs, and to Malcum M’Gee, interpreter to this treaty, each, one hundred and fifty dollars, in cash; and to Major William Glover, Col. George Colbert, Hopoyeahanmmar, Immauklusharhopoyea, Tushkarhopoye, Hopoyeahaummar, jun. Immauklusharhopyea, James Colbert, Coweamartblar, Illachouwarhopoyea, military leaders, one hundred dollars each; and do further agree, that any annuity heretofore secured to the Chickesaw nation of Indians, by treaty, to be paid in goods, shall hereafter be paid in cash.

In testimony whereof the said commissioners, and undersigned chiefs and warriors, have set their hands and seals. Done at the treaty ground east of Old Town, this nineteenth day of October, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and eighteen.

Andrew Jackson, [L. S.]

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